Art and the open community

Back in the days when I started using FOSS, mostly for genealogy and my daily computer uses, I wondered about the art that was been created and how would evolve with time. I then found about software like GIMP, Blender and Inkscape, and without knowing much about the way they worked I decided to give it a try.

After a few attempts, I finally got comfortable doing digital painting and illustration, a bit of design and just barely scratched the very bare bone basics of 3D. For the later I decided to acquired a book and see if I could go any further, sad to say, but I haven’t really applied myself to that area, hopefully this year would bring me into it.

The book did got me some new information about digital art in general, and something that at that time was totally new to me, Open and or Libre art, using Creative Commons and its different levels of licensing of media. Its practically the same principals as public media, and it becomes sustainable the same way, by its viewers or users support. Something that got me curios and that I’ve been pursuing ever since.

The same book also let me know of an artist and a program that would become the basis of my learning experience. The software was Krita, as soon as I tried it, immediately felt comfortable with the way it worked, but it took some time for it to be stable in my computer as it was at that time been heavily overhauled and developed, around the 2.x series.

The artist I learned about it in the book was doing exactly what I always wanted to achieved, no at the level he manage, but with similar bases, thus the only way for me to learn was to get involved a tiny bit with his project. I don’t have a proper art or computer education, thus the challenge was not only to learn how he develop his art, but also to learn myself digital art and some technology at the same time.

Needless to say that this artist I’m talking about is David Revoy, and that the project he created is actually an art platform that involves a community of people that has been serving me as a school and teachers respectively, to whom I’m very thankful and pleased to had met.

I’m also a close observer or the Krita community and its friendly creators, I do not have the skills to contribute to the project but keep using their development version and reporting little things here and there when possible. Digital art wouldn’t be this much fun without this program.

Much more time that I wanted has passed before I can start a stable project in digital art, but I didn’t feel skilled enough till recently, in all aspects, and even now the learning process will not only continue but maybe get even harder.

To celebrate this new episode in my art journey and to render homage to the project that has gave much education I started with this simple but meaningful Fan Art from the characters of the open comic Pepper&Carrot, followed by the first Fan Art I did years ago and practically my first contribution to that project.

 Kokeshi Protocol artwork, text and content by RJ Quiralta in this website are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License, unless otherwise stated. 
Kokeshi Protocol, Quiralta and き ら る た trademarks and logos by RJ Quiralta are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

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